Matinum

Taking Charge of Your Health


Life was not going as planned. Recently divorced from Mr. Wrong, I was 24-years-old, single mother to a 3-year-old, living in a trailer home in a new place. Nowhere near any of my family. Even my friends had all moved on. So the plan was for me to go back to college and get my degree, but the cost of bills, daycare, college tuition — these were all big obstacles to executing on that plan. Not to mention how difficult it would be to be away from my beautiful daughter. Fortunately, I had something to fall back on. When I was 16-years-old, growing up in Eagle River, Alaska my mother taught me a skill. Actually, she kind of made me learn it, but that’s another story. She was a medical transcriptionist. Through my mom’s great persistence, not to mention patience, I learned the craft of transcribing doctor’s records. While it was an unusual gig for a teenager, I am thankful to my mom for pushing me to gain that skill. In fact, it changed the course of my life. By learning medical transcription I didn’t just have the ability to get a part-time job I had the gift of serious know-how for a real career. And a place to turn to when I was at my lowest point. Finishing college, being there to raise my daughter, paying the bills — they were all achievable because of my ability to transcribe. Even though I swore I would never get up early again after high school most days I would wake up about 5:00 AM and work from home until my baby would wake up. Then it was off to college with my favorite study partner. once classes were over and bedtime stories were read it was time to do homework and get a few more records transcribed. It was busy and exhausting, but I was doing what I had to do to make a change. At the same time, my friends were asking me, “How was I able to work, juggle college and motherhood without putting my baby in daycare?” I definitely felt a pull to pass on the legacy of my mother, to share the knowledge she gave me with other people looking for a real solution to earning an income from home. So I started teaching people how to transcribe medical records. It was an incredible feeling to watch people learn and then be able to bless their families with an ability to earn an income. So, I took what I knew, both from working as a transcriptionist and from teaching my friends, and I created an education program. I put it online in 1998. I didn’t realize how early it was to be online back then. 10 students became 50, then 100, then 1000s. I added medical coding in 2005 and my courses have been teaching these career skills for more than 25 years now. Sometimes, I am in awe when I think that a 100,000 people’s lives have been changed by taking these educational programs I have created. Unfortunately, technology advances made medical transcription not just a viable career anymore, but medical coding is hotter than ever. And more and more every year more medical coding jobs are available to be done from home. Maybe your home. Work as a medical coder. Set your own schedule. Don’t miss a moment with your kids. Provide for your family with a real career in an incredibly stable industry. Learning a skill changed my life; it can change yours too. ♪♪♪

9 thoughts on “How medical coding changed my life

  1. Hello, what is career wize all about? I am a phlebotomist for 2 1/2 yrs now and have been thinking about becoming a medical coder. Can you answer some questions I have

  2. I am currently studying billing and coding on Penn foster.
    I am about to graduate from that but my fear of failing the certification test is making me so anxious.
    I feel like I need one on one instructor help to help me choose the correct codes….

  3. I just received my ICD-10-PCS, CPT Professional and other books that I have not received yet, really seeking for help on how do I start this, what system would I go on. I am really interested in learning coding, I really need someone to help me please.

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